Boon

Do you often wonder why the prices of products from one country differ from the next? I mean, after exchange rates computations. (Business people will cite numerous factors for the disparities.)

Take the price of an egg. In our country, you can have it for 5 pesos. Are you paying a lot more for the same commodity? I hope not. 🙂

I had this sense of calculation when I lived abroad. Every time I bought something I always computed and compared the local price to ours back home. The large difference often forced me to reconsider the purchase. 🙂

Now, I know why foreigners like my country. If they can get a burger back home for a certain amount in their currency, the converted rate could probably feed them with three burgers locally.

I remember once, during a visit of my sister and her family, my nephew bought a small bunch of bananas. Automatically, he figured out how much it would cost him back home. (This habit probably runs in the family.) When the vendor told him the price, he was elated to note how cheap it was that he left the change. (Of course, I was there to get the change so not to let vendors take advantage of my nephew the next time around.)

So, when you are in a country less developed than yours, discover the food you don’t usually eat at home. You’ll get your money’s worth.

BLOGGING   LIFE/STYLES   MY STORIES   WHISPER   ZONE

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2 thoughts on “Boon

  1. I find translating from one currency to another hard work, so I take to the local on at once, seldom thinking what an item might cost at home.

    As far as I can see, the price of bananas has fallen quite a lot in real terms where I live, which can’t be good news for those who grow them.

    1. It was a habit I tried to remove from my system. 🙂
      If the price is steep, I don’t buy. It is as simple as that. 🙂
      Local farmers have their share of loses. I believe it’s the middlemen and wholesale buyers who rake more profits.

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